The language of Xmas markets

Check out today’s Teatime Titbit: Wonderful Wednesday Words: The language of Xmas markets

Is a stroll (Bummel) around a Xmas market on your schedule for your next foreign visitor/client? If so, equip yourself with all those words you’ll need to explain all the treats (Leckerbissen) and goodies (tolle Sachen), which are on offer around every corner.

The stall offerings range from jewellery and handicrafts (Kunsthandwerke), clothes & toys, to finger licking yummies (Leckereien) like crepes coated with sugar and cinnamon (Zimt), stollen (German Christmas fruitcake), gingerbread (Lebkuchen) to name but a few. If you fancy (Lust auf) a nibble (etw zu knabbern), you can’t go wrong with savouries (Würzbissen) like potato fritter (Reibekuchen = grated raw potatoes fried into a pancake) with apple puree, sausages with a bread roll, curry wurst*, garlic mushrooms.

Then wash it all down with the ultimate Xmas market highlight Glühwein aka mulled wine or it’s cousin in crime the one and only red wine punch ‘Feuerzangenboule’ ! (cut out and keep explanation! – “it’s made by setting fire to sugar coated in rum and allowing it to drip into the mulled wine” – naughty but nice).

If you want to go the extra mile, “with a shot of ……” really is the correct translation for ‘Schuss’. English CAN be so easy, can’t it?

Before your guest insists on buying a round and you’re too merry (beschwipst) to explain the procedure, let him/her in on the secret of the ‘deposit’ (Pfand), which they get back, so long as if they don’t take the mug (Tasse) with them as a memento.(Andenken)

Hope it helps. Never fret (hier: sich Sorgen machen) KISS “Oh It’s a German speciality, just try it, you’ll love it.” with a smile on your face will also do.

(*please don’t translate it as ‘curried sausage’ – as anyone who knows Indian cuisine, will have a different picture- say ‘sausage with a spicy ketchup’)

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